Employer Tips

What New Hires Want from the Onboarding Experience

 
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Onboarding can make or break any new hire. If you aren’t properly onboarding your new staff, these workers may become a flight risk. New research reveals that 64% of new employees are less likely to stay at a job after a negative onboarding experience.

We’ll break down what employees want from their onboarding experiences a little later, but first, we want to highlight more findings from the research because we feel that the data provides important clues as to why employees are leaving. Back to the research!

Millennials Most Likely to Leave

The fact that 64% of employees are leaving after a negative onboarding experience is especially important to consider as the hiring market continues to be competitive. Research also found that 40% of employees are expected to quit their jobs this year. Of these employees, some of the most important to consider are those in the Millennial age range, as they are the true future of the workplace.
Research found that 60% of Millennials say they are open to a different job opportunity, which likely has to do with the fact that the majority of Millennials (55%) feel like they are not engaged at work. In other words, if businesses want to retain young talent, they need to ensure an engaging, positive workplace experience from the first day of employment.

Three things to consider when reviewing your onboarding experience:

Employees often feel mislead by job descriptions. 

More than 25% of employees say that they didn’t receive enough information about their job before accepting the offer. Meanwhile, only 40% of employees say that their current job completely reflects how the position was described during the interview process.


New hires prefer an organic onboarding process. 

Of the new hires surveyed, more people (33%) dread adapting to office politics and personalities more than learning protocol or filing onboarding paperwork. However, not all new personalities are bad. About half (49%) of employees believe the best way to get acclimated to a new job is by making friends in the workplace, and would rather make friends with coworkers than have a designated new-hire buddy.


Interactive onboarding would make new employees feel more comfortable. 

New hires don’t want to be singled out. A majority of employees surveyed (38%) report they feel most welcome during onboarding when included in a group of other new hires. Additionally, new hires prefer intro meetings and interactive onboarding groups (31%) more than happy hours with colleagues. This is important for businesses to consider, especially when over half (52%) of employees state they spend up to 5 hours being onboarded at their new job.

In order to retain your talent longer be sure to keep these three insights in mind when onboarding new hires.


What Training Skills Do Your Managers Need?

 
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Managers are often expected to have some role in the training and development of their employees. After all, it’s the manager who oversees the work of his or her staff members. In addition, as the person responsible for the team’s performance, managers have a strong incentive to mold the performance of the individuals who compose that team. Unfortunately, managers aren’t necessarily the best trainers. Oftentimes, they are put in a management role because of their technical aptitude, charisma, or ability to lead. If companies want their managers to also be able to train staff effectively, they need to make sure their managers have the requisite skills. Let’s look at the critical skills necessary to position managers as effective trainers.

Communication

This may sound obvious, but communication is a more complex skill than many people appreciate. Effective communication is the ability to convey information—and the significance of that information—from one person or group to another. It’s more than just telling someone that “we always send a thank-you to sales prospects after we’ve given them a demo.” It means conveying the significance of that activity and explaining how and why it fits in with the company’s broader mission.

Identifying Learning Styles

Not everyone learns the same way. There are numerous learning styles, with some people learning more effectively by listening, some by doing, some by individual study, etc. To be effective at training staff members, a manager needs to understand these different styles and to adapt messages if some team members don’t seem to be picking up on the message the first time around.

Passion

Passion might not necessarily sound like a skill, but it is. Passion, in the sense we’re using it, doesn’t necessarily mean genuine passion in every aspect of every bit of information being presented. It means the ability to convey a sense of passion to those being trained. A manager who comes across as apathetic or who is simply going through the motions when training staff isn’t going to encourage a high level of retention and commitment from his or her employees. Not all managers are natural teachers and trainers, and they don’t need to be experts. But they should, at least, be somewhat well-versed in the three key skills mentioned above that can help them be more effective at assisting in the training and development of their staff.


How to Avoid Misclassifying Unpaid Interns This Summer — and All Year Long

 
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The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) revised test for determining whether interns are employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) just turned one, and the summer hiring season is fast approaching. Misclassification can be costly for employers. Let’s make sure you understand and are correctly applying the DOL’s revised test for unpaid internships.

DOL Identifies 7 Factors for Determining ‘Primary Beneficiary’

A year ago, the DOL announced a new primary beneficiary test for determining whether interns are employees under the FLSA. The Act requires for-profit employers to pay employees for their work. Under the Act, “employ” means to “suffer or permit to work.” Based on that vague definition, interns and students may qualify as employees to whom compensation must be paid.

Under the primary beneficiary test, the DOL uses seven factors to determine whether the employer or the intern is the primary beneficiary of the relationship. The test is intended to be flexible and dependent on the unique circumstances of each case, and no single factor is determinative. In its statement announcing the adoption of the primary beneficiary test, the DOL noted the change would “eliminate unnecessary confusion among the regulated community” and give the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) “increased flexibility to holistically analyze internships on a case-by-case basis.”

The Primary Beneficiary Test Includes an Examination Of:

  • The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand there is no expectation of compensation (any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests the intern is an employee—and vice versa);

  • The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to training provided in an educational environment, including the clinical and other hands-on training offered by educational institutions;

  • The extent to which the internship is tied to the intern’s formal educational program by integrated coursework or the receipt of academic credit;

  • The extent to which the internship accommodates the intern’s academic commitments by corresponding to the academic calendar;

  • The extent to which the internship’s duration is limited to the period in which it provides the intern with beneficial learning;

  • The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than displaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern; and

  • The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is conducted without entitlement to a paid job at its conclusion.

If the intern is found to be the primary beneficiary of the parties’ relationship, he wouldn’t be considered an employee under the FLSA, and he would therefore be exempt from the Act’s payment requirements for employees.

What This Means for You

The DOL has increasingly scrutinized internships and cracked down on the misclassification of workers and interns. As a result, you should take steps to ensure your interns meet the primary beneficiary test. Evaluate each internship on a case-by-case basis, and carefully consider the structure of your internship program and the program run by the schools with which you affiliate, as well as any compensation you offer and your method of payment. Merely labeling a summer position an “internship” doesn’t mean you won’t have to pay the intern—compensability depends on whether the intern receives the primary benefit of your arrangement with him.

Additionally, you must take care that all written communications and materials related to your internship program are carefully worded to avoid any inference of an employment relationship. Double-check the wording on your webpages and downloadable information and any mailers, marketing materials, internship agreements, and other relevant documentation that you provide to interns and their schools.